In a debate on the country’s current predicament, Conservative Party MP Helen Whately defended Theresa May’s Brexit plan while also attacking Labour’s inability to articulate their own Brexit strategy. Her attack was directed at Shadow Justice Secretary and Shadow Chancellor Richard Burgon who tried to clarify the Labour position. Mr Burgon also demanded that Mrs May must look for compromise outside her party in order to do what is best for the country.

In response, Ms Whately said: “You’re asking the Prime Minister to come to some compromise with your deal but your party doesn’t have a plan.

“You’ve been unable to articulate a clear and coherent Brexit plan.”

After her Brexit deal was voted down in a historic loss in Parliament a few weeks ago, Mrs May opened the doors to cross-party discussions.

However, Mrs May and Mr Corbyn only met on Wednesday to discuss the Brexit crisis as the Labour leader refused to meet with the Prime Minister unless a no-deal scenario was removed from the negotiations.

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His change in tact comes after Caroline Spelman’s amendment which invited Parliament to declare its opposition to a no-deal scenario was passed.

Crucially for the Prime minister, Sir Graham Brady’s amendment was also passed this week which presented “alternative arrangements” to the Irish backstop.

Mr Burgon added: “What a Prime Minister should be doing is not negotiating within her own party but bring people who voted leave and remain together.

“That’s the moral duty of the Prime Minister.

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“If she can’t do that, then that’s a very serious matter for our democracy.”

Mr Burgon, however, was criticised for Labour’s lack of compromise in the Brexit debate and stubbornness over their proposed red lines.

His comments come after fellow Labour MP, Lisa Nandy admitted that her party must star to drop some of its demands in order to avoid a no-deal Brexit.

She said: “We have to start compromising and we have to start dropping some of the red lines that are stopping us to getting to a deal or we will by default end up with no deal.

“It’s also incumbent on the Labour Party now to start making real choices about what it is that we want because we’re two and a half years on from the referendum and there’s still a debate going on within the Labour Party about whether we respect the result of the referendum or whether we have a second referendum.”

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